PowerShell

Get-SystemInfo: Listing System Configuration of all Computers (systeminfo)

In one of my previous blog posts PowerShell: Documenting your environment by running systeminfo on all Domain-Computers I have described how to list important system information of all Domain Computers by running systeminfo. Now I want to paste it in a function. The name of this function will be Get-SystemInfo. What a surprise. I’m really a creative person.  🙂 And here it is.

The Goal

The approach is to gather all relevant Operating System information from all Domain Computer and/or Domain Servers or from one or more computers. It should look like this:

100

Unbenannt

As mentioned, I’ve already prepared some stuff in a previous blog post. Now I want to go a huge step further.

Get-SystemInfo

The Parameters

Get-SystemInfo enables you to define a scope or computername. Pressing CTRL+Space lists all options. Two of them are particularly interesting.

1

A closer look at parameters …

Ok, I have to admit I’m not a professional developer who cares much about error and error conditions. But I try to provide some help. Pay attention to the description of the scope parameter.

8.PNG

Or simply type Get-SytemInfo -Scope and then press CTRL+Space.

9

Which brings me to the next part: Playing with Get-SystemInfo. Remember the parameter values. Now they come into play … and action …

Get-SystemInfo in Action: Defining a Scope

Query all Servers

4.PNG

Query all Domain-Controllers

5.PNG

Query all Client Computer (WinRM must be enabled, it’s disabled by default on all client operating systems)

7.PNG

For enabling WinRM with Group Policies see:

Group Policies: Enabling WinRM for Windows Client Operating Systems (Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7)

Query all Computers

6.PNG

Do you like it? Let’s keep going it’s not the end …

Get-SystemInfo in Action: Defining a Computer Name

Running on one Computer only

10

Running on multiple computer (separate them by comma)

11

Which brings me to the last part of this blog post. Actually, the most important thing. The function itsself.

The Function

Make sure you run the code an a Domain Controller or on a computer with RSAT installed.

function Get-SystemInfo {
param
(
[parameter(HelpMessage='Enter the following values: LocalHost, ServerOnly, DCOnly, ClientOnly or AllComputer')]
[ValidateSet('LocalHost', 'ServerOnly', 'DCOnly', 'ClientOnly', 'AllComputer')]
$Scope, $ComputerName
)
$header='Host Name','OS','Version','Manufacturer','Configuration','Build Type','Registered Owner','Registered Organization','Product ID','Install Date','Boot Time','System Manufacturer','Model','Type','Processor','Bios','Windows Directory','System Directory','Boot Device','Language','Keyboard','Time Zone','Total Physical Memory','Available Physical Memory','Virtual Memory','Virtual Memory Available','Virtual Memory in Use','Page File','Domain','Logon Server','Hotfix','Network Card','Hyper-V'
If ($Scope -eq 'ServerOnly') {
Invoke-Command -ComputerName (Get-ADComputer -Filter {operatingsystem -like '*server*'}).Name {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView
}
elseif ($Scope -eq 'DCOnly') {
Invoke-Command -ComputerName (Get-ADDomainController -Filter *).Name {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView
}
elseif ($Scope -eq 'LocalHost')
{systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1 | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView
}
elseif ($Scope -eq 'ClientOnly') {
Invoke-Command -ComputerName (Get-ADComputer -Filter {operatingsystem -notlike '*server*'}).Name {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView
}
elseif ($Scope -eq 'AllComputer') {
Invoke-Command -ComputerName (Get-ADComputer -Filter *).Name {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView
}
elseif ($ComputerName) {
Invoke-Command -ComputerName $ComputerName {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView
}
}

The script has grown over time. One of my followers pointed out to me that it would be better to work with switch instead lots of If and elseif. Thank you for the advice. Here is the function with switch. We can thus save some lines.


function Get-SystemInfo {
param
(
[parameter(HelpMessage='Enter the following values: LocalHost, ServerOnly, DCOnly, ClientOnly or AllComputer')]
[ValidateSet('LocalHost', 'ServerOnly', 'DCOnly', 'ClientOnly', 'AllComputer')]
$Scope, $ComputerName
)
$header='Host Name','OS','Version','Manufacturer','Configuration','Build Type','Registered Owner','Registered Organization','Product ID','Install Date','Boot Time','System Manufacturer','Model','Type','Processor','Bios','Windows Directory','System Directory','Boot Device','Language','Keyboard','Time Zone','Total Physical Memory','Available Physical Memory','Virtual Memory','Virtual Memory Available','Virtual Memory in Use','Page File','Domain','Logon Server','Hotfix','Network Card','Hyper-V'
switch ($Scope)
{
'ServerOnly' {Invoke-Command -ComputerName (Get-ADComputer -Filter {operatingsystem -like '*server*'}).Name {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView}
'DCOnly' {Invoke-Command -ComputerName (Get-ADDomainController -Filter *).Name {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView}
'LocalHost' {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1 | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView}
'ClientOnly' {Invoke-Command -ComputerName (Get-ADComputer -Filter {operatingsystem -notlike '*server*'}).Name {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView}
'AllComputer' {Invoke-Command -ComputerName (Get-ADComputer -Filter *).Name {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView}
}
If ($ComputerName) {
Invoke-Command -ComputerName $ComputerName {systeminfo /FO CSV | Select-Object -Skip 1} -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header $header | Out-GridView
}
}

Make it permanent

If you like my approach open PowerShell ISE. Copy the function to your ISE session. Create a folder in C:\Program Files\Windows PowerShell\Modules and save the code as psm1 file. Make sure that your file name and folder name match.

Unbenannt.PNG

Close PowerShell. Open PowerShell again. The command is now available for all users. Have fun with Get-SystemInfo!

See also

It’s worth taking a look at my other functions which are very useful for day-to-day tasks:

Test- FirewallAllServer: Query the Firewall status on all Windows Servers (enabled/disabled)

PowerShell: Find out whether a host is really down or not with Test-ConnectionLocalSubnet (ping, arp)

PowerShell: Notify me when someone is added to the Administrator Group

3 replies »

  1. Good Work Patrick. This is what i was looking for , It will add more value if you could add “Individual Computers” in scope and it will have comma separated computer names so that user can specify the choice of his own computers. The other most information missing here is about the Hard Disk info about computers. Also one suggestion if you rewrite this using these commandlets (Get-WmiObject or Get-CimInstance ) it will be much fast in bringing results.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.